NOÖ [15] is here! Featuring presentations of great books, some alumni spotlights, shepherds and crosses collaged, feather sisters, tossing phones into the water, animated knife piles, a girl who plays football named Tractor, shadow doves, batshit heroines, sunset cannonballs, peaceful blemishes, new gaps,#FUCKYESOXYGEN, and loving yourself at night.NOÖ is back and bigly.And hey, if you like it, can you share maybe a line or a piece of art or something else you like and post it or Tweet about it? Whether it’s someone new to you or dear as a good old pet whale, we’d love to spread the word about all the fantastic work in this issue!If you hate your computer screen, look for FREE (9 years and counting!) print copies of NOÖ [15] dappling across everywhere in a month or so! Don’t forget: you’re the best, and coconut mango sticky rice is great with wine.Thank you!Mike & NOÖ crew

NOÖ [15] is here! 

Featuring presentations of great books, some alumni spotlights, shepherds and crosses collaged, feather sisters, tossing phones into the water, animated knife piles, a girl who plays football named Tractor, shadow doves, batshit heroines, sunset cannonballs, peaceful blemishes, new gaps,#FUCKYESOXYGEN, and loving yourself at night.

NOÖ is back and bigly.

And hey, if you like it, can you share maybe a line or a piece of art or something else you like and post it or Tweet about it? Whether it’s someone new to you or dear as a good old pet whale, we’d love to spread the word about all the fantastic work in this issue!

If you hate your computer screen, look for FREE (9 years and counting!) print copies of NOÖ [15] dappling across everywhere in a month or so! Don’t forget: you’re the best, and coconut mango sticky rice is great with wine.

Thank you!
Mike & NOÖ crew


Hi, this is Mike. Hope y’all are having a nice summer evening with not too many thunderstorms or missile attacks or dehydrated peas. I have two big pieces of NOÖ news, so I made an infographic for them. You can get the main news by looking at the picture above all this text. In all this text, I will explain the news emotionally.NOÖ has been around almost ten years, and while my love for NOÖ has not diminished, my energy for actually working on the darn thing has waned as my life has undergone major squiggles and changes in the last few years. This means that I’ve been taking a crazy long time to finish NOÖ [15] and an even crazier and longer time to interact with all the people good enough to reach out to NOÖ in many ways, such as by sending us work they made and cared about and wanted to see in NOÖ. If people thought about NOÖ at all, they probably thought it died! It is easy for things to die in our infinitely scrolling world, or get ignored, etc. But I want to say I really appreciate—always and forever—all of you reading NOÖ and thinking of us as a good place for your work and just generally being around NOÖ to hang out and encounter the world with us. In the nine years NOÖ has been around—as I’ve worked on it alone and with my friends Kyle Peterson and Ryan Call, as well as many other helpers and interns and submission readers and copyeditors, all of us volunteering our time—it’s found a lot of readers and fans and good folks, in its quiet weird free punk grayscale stapled way. Real talk: 99% of the writers I know, I met in some way initially through doing NOÖ! I honestly can’t imagine what my life would look like without all the friends and cool people I’ve met through NOÖ and all the amazing work NOÖ has been able to broadcast and share.You might guess this is the part where I say NOÖ is over, I’m driving the boat out to the middle of the lake and driving the boat back alone, etc, and actually I really wanted to do that, but after reflection and discussion with friends, I realize that what NOÖ does is still pretty cool and unique. There aren’t a lot of other free literary magazines as sneaky and exciting as NOÖ appearing both in print and online and popping up all over the country the way NOÖ does, thanks to the incredible network of support it’s built over the years. And just because I don’t have the same energy for it that I used to have doesn’t mean it should die just yet. So what I’m doing is handing it over to a new team of editors. Heading this team (in alphabetical order) will be:

Tyler Gobble — Editor in Chief (tyler@noojournal.com)Austin Hayden — Fiction Editor (austin@noojournal.com)Gene Kwak — Fiction Editor (gene@noojournal.com)Carrie Lorig — Poetry Editor (carrie@noojournal.com)Nick Sturm — Poetry Editor (nick@noojournal.com)

These are all people very dear to my heart, and I’m tickled to Pluto and back that they’ve agreed to nurture NOÖ back to health and make it better than ever. I’m going to stay onboard as designer (I still like that part!) and publisher (I have a pretty cool 9-5 job that helps me pay for NOÖ and keep it free), but all editorial decisions and correspondence will be handled by Tyler and crew. They already have a lot of great ideas about distribution, parties, and maybe even shirts*.*(We haven’t really talked about shirts).***Here are some good questions posed by a very aggressive hypothetical questioner:Q: YEAH YEAH THIS IS ALL REALLY CHEESY AND NICE (BARF) BUT WHEN IS NOÖ [15] COMING OUT?A: NOÖ [15] is coming out August 14th. You can see a tiny preview of the cover in the image above.Q: YEAH OK I’LL BELIEVE IT WHEN I SEE IT, JERK. WHEN IS NOÖ [16] COMING OUT AND CAN I SEND YOU THIS AMAZING POEM I’VE BEEN WORKING ON ABOUT HOW MY SPIRIT ANIMAL IS A CASHEW AND I FORGOT TO TURN OFF THE BLADED TIMER (I CAN’T TELL YOU WHAT A BLADED TIMER IS BECAUSE IT’S IN MY POEM, WHICH YOU BETTER PUBLISH BECAUSE IT’S AMAZING)A: NOÖ [16] is coming out November 3rd. You can send work here: http://noojournal.com/submissions.htm.Q: ARE THERE ANY MORE NOÖ WEEKLYS COMING TOO OR ARE YOU TOO MUCH OF A DWEEB, YOU DWEEB?A: New NOÖ Weeklys will be appearing after NOÖ [15]. Three are forthcoming, featuring the guest editorial efforts of Lauren Ireland, Meagan Cass, and Sharon Zetter & Lucas M. Rivera.***Thank you again for reading and enjoying NOÖ. 2014 is a lot different than 2004 when it comes to literary magazines, and I’m actually pretty stoked that the landscape is chaotic and cluttered and loud. That’s healthy. I’m hopeful that the beauty and energy of all the new editors will bring about a—wait for it, wait for it—new NOÖ (oh man) that still has a fun role to play in the campfire of independent literature we’re all huddled and high-fiving and ghost-whispering around.Thank you for reading, have a good night, and please shower Tyler, Austin, Gene, Carrie, and Nick with your cashew milk smoothies of good wishes.See you on August 14th, Mike

Hi, this is Mike. Hope y’all are having a nice summer evening with not too many thunderstorms or missile attacks or dehydrated peas. I have two big pieces of NOÖ news, so I made an infographic for them. You can get the main news by looking at the picture above all this text. In all this text, I will explain the news emotionally.

NOÖ has been around almost ten years, and while my love for NOÖ has not diminished, my energy for actually working on the darn thing has waned as my life has undergone major squiggles and changes in the last few years. 

This means that I’ve been taking a crazy long time to finish NOÖ [15] and an even crazier and longer time to interact with all the people good enough to reach out to NOÖ in many ways, such as by sending us work they made and cared about and wanted to see in NOÖ. If people thought about NOÖ at all, they probably thought it died! It is easy for things to die in our infinitely scrolling world, or get ignored, etc. But I want to say I really appreciate—always and forever—all of you reading NOÖ and thinking of us as a good place for your work and just generally being around NOÖ to hang out and encounter the world with us. 

In the nine years NOÖ has been around—as I’ve worked on it alone and with my friends Kyle Peterson and Ryan Call, as well as many other helpers and interns and submission readers and copyeditors, all of us volunteering our time—it’s found a lot of readers and fans and good folks, in its quiet weird free punk grayscale stapled way. 

Real talk: 99% of the writers I know, I met in some way initially through doing NOÖ! I honestly can’t imagine what my life would look like without all the friends and cool people I’ve met through NOÖ and all the amazing work NOÖ has been able to broadcast and share.

You might guess this is the part where I say NOÖ is over, I’m driving the boat out to the middle of the lake and driving the boat back alone, etc, and actually I really wanted to do that, but after reflection and discussion with friends, I realize that what NOÖ does is still pretty cool and unique. There aren’t a lot of other free literary magazines as sneaky and exciting as NOÖ appearing both in print and online and popping up all over the country the way NOÖ does, thanks to the incredible network of support it’s built over the years. And just because I don’t have the same energy for it that I used to have doesn’t mean it should die just yet. 

So what I’m doing is handing it over to a new team of editors. Heading this team (in alphabetical order) will be:

Tyler Gobble — Editor in Chief (tyler@noojournal.com)

Austin Hayden — Fiction Editor (austin@noojournal.com)

Gene Kwak — Fiction Editor (gene@noojournal.com)

Carrie Lorig
— Poetry Editor (carrie@noojournal.com)

Nick Sturm
— Poetry Editor (nick@noojournal.com)

These are all people very dear to my heart, and I’m tickled to Pluto and back that they’ve agreed to nurture NOÖ back to health and make it better than ever. 

I’m going to stay onboard as designer (I still like that part!) and publisher (I have a pretty cool 9-5 job that helps me pay for NOÖ and keep it free), but all editorial decisions and correspondence will be handled by Tyler and crew. They already have a lot of great ideas about distribution, parties, and maybe even shirts*.

*(We haven’t really talked about shirts).

***

Here are some good questions posed by a very aggressive hypothetical questioner:

Q: YEAH YEAH THIS IS ALL REALLY CHEESY AND NICE (BARF) BUT WHEN IS NOÖ [15] COMING OUT?

A: NOÖ [15] is coming out August 14th. You can see a tiny preview of the cover in the image above.

Q: YEAH OK I’LL BELIEVE IT WHEN I SEE IT, JERK. WHEN IS NOÖ [16] COMING OUT AND CAN I SEND YOU THIS AMAZING POEM I’VE BEEN WORKING ON ABOUT HOW MY SPIRIT ANIMAL IS A CASHEW AND I FORGOT TO TURN OFF THE BLADED TIMER (I CAN’T TELL YOU WHAT A BLADED TIMER IS BECAUSE IT’S IN MY POEM, WHICH YOU BETTER PUBLISH BECAUSE IT’S AMAZING)


A: NOÖ [16] is coming out November 3rd. You can send work here: http://noojournal.com/submissions.htm.

Q: ARE THERE ANY MORE NOÖ WEEKLYS COMING TOO OR ARE YOU TOO MUCH OF A DWEEB, YOU DWEEB?

A: New NOÖ Weeklys will be appearing after NOÖ [15]. Three are forthcoming, featuring the guest editorial efforts of Lauren Ireland, Meagan Cass, and Sharon Zetter & Lucas M. Rivera.

***

Thank you again for reading and enjoying NOÖ. 2014 is a lot different than 2004 when it comes to literary magazines, and I’m actually pretty stoked that the landscape is chaotic and cluttered and loud. That’s healthy. I’m hopeful that the beauty and energy of all the new editors will bring about a—wait for it, wait for it—new NOÖ (oh man) that still has a fun role to play in the campfire of independent literature we’re all huddled and high-fiving and ghost-whispering around.

Thank you for reading, have a good night, and please shower Tyler, Austin, Gene, Carrie, and Nick with your cashew milk smoothies of good wishes.

See you on August 14th, 
Mike


So what if it a last scowl of snow confuses your dogtooth pansies! Spring is maybe sort of finally in an inevitable-environmental-doom sort of way finally here, and with it comes a brand new color-themed NOÖ Weekly guest-edited by Carrie Lorig!http://noojournal.com/weekly.htmShe assigned seven of her favorite writers a color and out they came. Jared Harvey is Red. Donald Dunbar is Orange. Elisabeth Workman is Yellow. Edward Mullany is Green. Claire Donato is Blue. Bridget Mendel is Indigo. Cassandra Troyan is Violet.Do the look-see! And we promise that NOÖ [15] is coming, it’s taken forever, it’s 60 pages, and it will herald a big announcement about big changes for NOÖ.

So what if it a last scowl of snow confuses your dogtooth pansies! Spring is maybe sort of finally in an inevitable-environmental-doom sort of way finally here, and with it comes a brand new color-themed NOÖ Weekly guest-edited by Carrie Lorig!

http://noojournal.com/weekly.htm

She assigned seven of her favorite writers a color and out they came. Jared Harvey is Red. Donald Dunbar is Orange. Elisabeth Workman is Yellow. Edward Mullany is Green. Claire Donato is Blue. Bridget Mendel is Indigo. Cassandra Troyan is Violet.

Do the look-see! And we promise that NOÖ [15] is coming, it’s taken forever, it’s 60 pages, and it will herald a big announcement about big changes for NOÖ.


Undercastle by NOÖ [13] contributor Feliz Lucia Molina is out now from Magic Helicopter Press!Order your copy at Magic Helicopter Press’s website HERE.
Seriously guys, if I were a book THIS IS THE BOOK I WOULD BE.
It’s already got the attention of some really awesome poets:
"Really wonderful and important work. A great writer writing in the           most contemporary of mediums." — Kenneth Goldsmith
"My address is these poems. It’s amazing here! Dear Feliz, this is a love letter saying we’re about to give your book the Pulitzer Prize without the committee’s consent! Feliz Lucia Molina is the best kind of genius, she’s a poet, she believes in our phoenix rising!" — CAConrad 
To sample some of Feliz’s work read “Origami Casket" in NOÖ [13], 5 poems in The Scrambler. 

Undercastle by NOÖ [13] contributor Feliz Lucia Molina is out now from Magic Helicopter Press!

Order your copy at Magic Helicopter Press’s website HERE.

Seriously guys, if I were a book THIS IS THE BOOK I WOULD BE.

It’s already got the attention of some really awesome poets:

"Really wonderful and important work. A great writer writing in the           most contemporary of mediums." — Kenneth Goldsmith

"My address is these poems. It’s amazing here! Dear Feliz, this is a love letter saying we’re about to give your book the Pulitzer Prize without the committee’s consent! Feliz Lucia Molina is the best kind of genius, she’s a poet, she believes in our phoenix rising!" — CAConrad 

To sample some of Feliz’s work read “Origami Casket" in NOÖ [13]5 poems in The Scrambler


Anne Boyer’s “Buffalo Idyll #1" from NOÖ Weekly. Art from Das Puppendorf. Check out the rest of the Kansas City NOÖ Weekly edition guest-edited by Jordan Stempleman!

Anne Boyer’s “Buffalo Idyll #1" from NOÖ Weekly. Art from Das PuppendorfCheck out the rest of the Kansas City NOÖ Weekly edition guest-edited by Jordan Stempleman!



via Michael Dumontier at his blog Stopping off Place, who says: “from THE WISHING BONE CYCLE: Narrative Poems from the Swampy Cree Indians gathered and translated by Howard A. Norman, Stonehill, NY, 1976 The Wishing Bone poems constitute a “trickster cycle”, one of the oldest traditional genres of Cree oral literature. The inventor of these particlular poems was Jacob Nibenegenesabe, who lived for ninety-four years northeast of Lake Winnipeg, Canada.”

via Michael Dumontier at his blog Stopping off Place, who says: “from THE WISHING BONE CYCLE: Narrative Poems from the Swampy Cree Indians gathered and translated by Howard A. Norman, Stonehill, NY, 1976 The Wishing Bone poems constitute a “trickster cycle”, one of the oldest traditional genres of Cree oral literature. The inventor of these particlular poems was Jacob Nibenegenesabe, who lived for ninety-four years northeast of Lake Winnipeg, Canada.”


New NOÖ Weekly Guest Edited by Jordan Stempleman COMING SOON!

image

Remember the last NOÖ Weekly guest edited by Mel Bosworth? Remember how much you loved it? Starting to wonder when the next NOÖ Weekly is due to arrive? Starting to wonder when I’m going to stop asking questions?

Wonder no more, because the next NOÖ Weekly is COMING SOON! The upcoming Weekly is guest edited by JORDAN STEMPLEMAN, author of No, Not Today (Magic Helicopter Press, 2012) and editor of The Continental Review.


(AND I’m done asking questions!)

The issue will feature writers living in or connected to Kansas City (quick, guess which state Kansas City is in) including:

Anne Boyer
Bridget Lowe
Casey Hannan
Dan Magers
Lesley Wheeler
Ryan MacDonald
Teal Wilson
and 
James Tate


Psyched? I bet you are. Want it right now? Sorry, I said COMING SOON, not COMING RIGHT NOW. Get it together…

Well, I guess it wouldn’t hurt to give you a sneak peek BUT THAT’S ALL YOU GET (for now).

Enjoy!

"MANUAL FOR SELF-IMPROVEMENT"
—James Tate

            It was the first day of my life. That’s what I told my-

self. I walked over the bridge of contentment and followed

the path of self-possession. The first man I met punched me

in the mouth and I saw stars, and the blood running down my

throat. I said, “Did I say something to offend you?” He said,

“You’re full of shit, that’s all.” “Excuse me, I have no memory

of our having met before,” I said. “We haven’t. I just wanted us

to get off to a good start. I know your type and I can’t stand

them,” he said. “And what type is that?” I said. “You think

you’re better than everybody else. You’re smug, that’s what

you are,” he said. “You’re wrong about that. I’m very humble,”

I said. He spit on me, then walked away into the trees. I sat

there twiddling my thumbs until a large hawk flew over. I

could see that it held a mouse in its talons. “Goodbye, little

mouse,” I said. “I’m just going for a little ride. I’ll be

back, trust me,” it said. I waved to him and he was gone. I

stood up and walked for a while. I came to a lake, which was

just a glass of water on an abandoned beach. I dove in anyway

and swam around for some minutes until I banged my head on the

side of the glass. I climbed out and shook my head. A bee

buzzed my nose. “Why are you doing that?” I said. “Oh, excuse

me, I thought you were a tulip,” it said, then flew off. I didn’t

know I looked like a tulip. Well, maybe when wet. I walked a

little further. Nothing looked familiar. I was in a strange

land. There was a bamboo curtain behind which sat a little

mouse. “Hello, friend,” he said. I looked again. He wasn’t

there. And, then, neither was I.


Meet Blake Bergeron and Jane Dykema, the new NOÖ/MHP editorial assistants!

So according to all the burnished leaves swirling around in the parking lot outside the office where I work forty hours a week, sometimes a guy needs help creeping into his off-time and doing magazines and books.

And I’m like: you crazy leaves. Nobody ever needs help with anything.

But the leaves are right, and I’m wrong, which is why I’m so grateful to have the help of Tyler Gobble and Austin Hayden, as well as NOÖ’s crew of submission readers, and now with two new Editorial Assistants (I love fake job titles) from the UMass-Amherst MFA program: Blake Bergeron and Jane Dykema.

They’re already helping out with NOÖ Weeklys (the newest of which I will tell you about in the next post), reviews, interviews, organization, and even some cool new projects like the Live NOÖ Grand Marquis/Grandpa Markee Sessions (name TBD) that will be exciting as they sound.

What I can tell you is that Blake likes sesame sticks and Jane likes hummus. The rest they can tell you themselves!


imageBLAKE BERGERON Q&A

Do you ever climb things that aren’t in pictures?

It’s been hard ever since I hired that documentary film crew.

What is the best vista you’ve ever witnessed?

Other than Windows with its sweet spread of backgrounds? Probably the view from the top of Conundrum Creek in Aspen, CO. I was sitting in a hot spring with a naked nature lover named Evan Ravitz. He hikes up to the hot springs and lives there for two or three weeks each summer. He loves chatting up all of the other backpackers and lives off their unwanted food after they leave. I asked him if he had any use for a red pepper I brought with me, to which he replied,”I reckon I’ll eat it.”

Have you ever read or written a poem that competed with a vista?

A lot of Wordsworth does I guess. Yet, I’m drawn to a recent Dean Young poem, “Everyday Escapees.” I suppose it’s the lines between the third and fourth stanza: “Finally, / when I got off at the sixth floor, I felt / like I was walking out into the sky / and aren’t we all pedestrians of air?”

As for my poems, they’re too busy competing with themselves.

Can the silence experienced by a group together at the top of a rock be achieved in poetry or would everybody need to, like, hold the same piece of paper like a Ouija board?

I’m not sure. I’ll try to get some research funding and find out. Does anybody have a Ouija board?



imageJANE DYKEMA Q&A

Where did you grow up? What is one interesting character you remember from your hometown?

I grew up in Bay City, Michigan, a depressed, white-ass town nestled in the dip between the thumb and fingers of Michigan’s mitten shape. In the fall it smells like sugar beets being processed. I encourage you to check out the Notable Events in City History here.

In Bay City there is a divorce lawyer named Tom who said if he were ever to have a business that needed trucks, and he only had, say, three trucks, he would number them 1, 8 and 34 so that people would see them around town and think his business was booming. 

What are some of your favorite books?

The Heart is a Lonely Hunter – Carson McCullers
To the Lighthouse – Virginia Woolf
The Sea, the Sea – Iris Murdoch
The Fire Next Time – James Baldwin
The House on Mango Street – Sandra Cisneros
Cosmicomics – Italo Calvino
Hunger – Knut Hamsun
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime – Mark Haddon 

Every Christmas I read Franny and Zooey by J.D. Salinger. 

Right now I’m reading novellas and I love Down the Rabbit Hole by Juan Pablo Villalobos and Pale Horse Pale Rider by Katherine Anne Porter.

When did you first realize language could make people feel things?

When I was a little kid and I read The Giver for school and I cried all afternoon. And then when I was a little older and I read Beloved and hated every human except Toni Morrison.

What is your favorite meal? 

OH MAN.

Matar Paneer or Mujadara or Huevos Rancheros or whatever on the menu has avocados and onions and cheese. Also every breakfast food. I mostly eat cereal at home. 

Once upon a time I saw you read a story out loud about working at a youth center where everyone sold drugs. It was really funny and grim. Can you tell us about it? 

This community center was your typical “at risk youth” program run by some Harvard weenie. We were kids watching kids in a resource-poor setting, so you’re bound to get some supplemental income activity sprouting up. While I was there I knew I was getting an education I’d be able to write about, but I didn’t try for about six years. It takes me a long time to think about things and another long time to write about them.

Now can you relate your experience to this tangential follow-up with two colons in it: everybody knows that people in interesting frameworks reveal themselves interestingly, but I want to know what you think about people and stories: is it more like you meet a person and then you’re like “oh man that person is gonna give me a story to make” or is it more like you remember a group of people (a time, a place) and you realize you’ve got a story waiting?

So: as I’m drawn to people who would be great to write stories about because they’re interesting and/or make me feel extreme emotions, I write down things they say and then sit on them for a long time, till I can mash two or three real people into one character. And then, maybe because so much time has passed, I mix up sometimes who’s who, what really happened and what I’m making up. Yikes!

***

Welcome Blake and Jane!